U of A’s Student-Run Hill Records Releases EP Featuring Arkansan Artists



Photo courtesy of Hill Records

The EP cover for Hill Records’ latest album, Something Along the Lines Of

U of A student record label Hill Records is about to be released Something along the lines ofhis second compilation EP today, Friday November 18th. This latest EP features music from Arkansan artists in genres ranging from hip-hop to folk.

Building on its 2021 version From the heightsHill Records has expanded its catalog for 2022 with Something along the lines ofwhich features tracks from five different artists: “OKC” by Kwanza, “Subject 7” by Nub Wub, “Bring My Clothes Back Home” by Adam Posnak, “Pilot” by Run Ivy and “Pines” by YRLY.

Something along the lines of is available on all major streaming and digital platforms or accessible via the Hill Records website.

“Making this EP with so many talented artists and the wonderful team of officers at Hill Records has been such a rewarding, educational and fun experience,” said Amy Whiteside, President of Hill Records. “We are so happy to be able to continue showcasing the fantastic music Arkansas has to offer.”

Students from the U of A’s Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences, Walton College of Business and the College of Engineering – representing a wide variety of disciplines – collaborated on Something along the lines of.

“Experiential learning is an essential part of music industry education,” said Hill Records Faculty Advisory Board member Jake Hertzog. “We are excited about the continued growth of the Hill Records project and the opportunities it presents for students and artists.”

Hertzog said that since its launch, Hill Records has demonstrated the growing importance of music and interdisciplinary education.

“The release of this EP aims to offer students at the University of Arkansas a chance to be active members of the music industry and gives independent and local artists the opportunity to develop their artistic talent and expand their portfolios,” he added.

About Kwanza

Fast cars, neon billboards, night cruises around your hometown: this is the vision brought to life by Kwanza.

This up-and-coming rapper/songwriter commands the mic; its rhythmic flow speaks to an ever-changing generation that grew up with the likes of Biz Markie, Logic, Bow Wow and Chance the Rapper.

The changing of the seasons brings the evolution of a new sound, and this U of A alum is three steps ahead of his audience. Kwanza’s latest single “OKC” pays homage to his past life in Owasso, Oklahoma.

About NubWub

Nub Wub, a local producer from Fayetteville, creates high-level digital electronic music, or EDM, tracks that take control of crowds. Born Elliot Huels, he is creatively fueled and artistically equipped with a style that can range from that of a household name the whole family listens to, to a stereo, to exploratory musical territories where the individual can find their expression with a pair of headphones on a crowded train.

He expanded his audience in the EDM scene by incorporating classical trumpet into his tracks. Exploring all sub-genres of EDM, he draws inspiration from influences such as Marshmello and Zedd, as well as fellow EDM producers One True God and Knock2. Nub Wub strives to captivate every listener with every new track and gain an audience to eventually perform live at major venues such as EDC and Ultra, becoming a one-handed sensation.

About Adam Posnak

Adam Posnak is an American singer born in Macon, Georgia. His fascination with his parents’ eclectic record collection is the source of his various musical inspirations. Posnak has been steeped in the unique culture and music of the South all his life. He has lived throughout the region, most recently in the scenic Ozarks of Arkansas. Posnack’s music is inspired by songs from the past.

“I try not to discriminate too much between rural blues, Appalachian ballads, country dances or sea shanties, and approach them all with the same degree of carelessness,” he said.

Posnack’s broader take on traditional American music has given his new single, “Bring My Clothes Back Home,” a unique sound that’s reminiscent of a different era but doesn’t feel out of place today.

About Run Ivy

Originally from Memphis, Tennessee, Run Ivy is a singer-songwriter whose sound incorporates elements of rock, folk and pop music.

Using the influence of artists such as Andy Shauf and Alex G, Ivy creates a fresh and unique sound suitable for a diverse audience.

After spending time studying in Arkansas, he moved to Nashville to hone his craft and work on a brand new EP due out in July. From small, intimate venues to gigs with large crowds, Ivy’s mission is “to rock everyone”.

About YRLY

YRLY is a three-piece indie pop band from Fayetteville consisting of guitar/vocalist duo Mariel Kasman and Jack Sullivan, and keyboard/vocalist Elyse Mead. YRLY’s tinged mix of folk pop, indie rock and neo-soul swirls to create a lush yet minimalist sound akin to bands like DAISY, Bright Eyes and Big Thief.



About Hill Records: Hill Records is a student-run record label and entertainment project at the U of A. This cutting-edge initiative combines music industry pedagogy, entrepreneurial learning, and audio research into integrated interdisciplinary experiences. Contact [email protected] with any questions or for more information.

About the University of Arkansas: As Arkansas’ flagship institution, the U of A offers an internationally competitive education in more than 200 academic programs. Founded in 1871, the U of A contributes more than $2.2 billion to the Arkansas economy through the teaching of new knowledge and skills, entrepreneurship and employment development, discovery through research and creative activity while providing training for professional disciplines. The Carnegie Foundation ranks the U of A among the few American colleges and universities with the highest level of research activity. US News & World Report ranks the U of A among the top public universities in the nation. Learn how the U of A is working to build a better world at Arkansas Research News.



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